Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is EdgeGuard?
  2. Why do I care if I have a cracked windshield?
  3. What will EdgeGuard look like on my vehicle?
  4. How can a 3" wide piece of high impact resistant plastic protect my entire windshield from cracking?
  5. Why are "edge cracks" the cause of 65% - 85% of windshield replacements?
  6. My windshield has some damage. What are my options?
  7. How can I guard against having my windshield improperly installed?
  8. What can I do to protect myself from the dangers related to faulty windshield installations?
  9. How can I determine if my replacement windshield was properly installed?
  10. What are some of the "short cuts" taken by less scrupulous windshield replacement shops?
  11. Are windshield installations made by mobile providers as good as those done at glass shops?
  12. What's EdgeGuard's impact on the environment?

Don't see your question here? Email us and we'll get back to you within 48 hours.


1What is EdgeGuard?

EdgeGuard is a patented application of a thin, transparent layer of high-impact, durable plastic installed around the outer edge (2-3'') of your windshield.  By protecting the weakest part of the windshield from damage from road debris, EdgeGuard extends the life of the windshield -- guaranteed!


2. Why do I care if I have a cracked windshield?

Several reasons:

  1. Your windshield plays a critical role in protecting you and your passengers in the event of an accident. A damaged windshield significantly increases your chances of head and neck injuries in a roll over! To learn more, click here .
  2. It's important to keep your original windshield for as long as possible.  Your original windshield is the safest windshield your vehicle will ever have. To learn more, click here .
  3. It's a hassle to get your windshield replaced and chances are, it won't be done properly. To learn more, click here .

By prolonging the life of your original windshield for as long as possible, EdgeGuard maximizes your safety and reduces the time and money you spend replacing windshields.


3.  What will EdgeGuard look like on my vehicle?

Very much like the windshield wipers, rear view mirror, and windshield itself, drivers and passengers alike very quickly forget it's even present. Unless they know what to look for, most people will not be able to see EdgeGuard on a vehicle 20 feet away.

Even though the EdgeGuard material is around the entire perimeter of the windshield, it's only visible on the lower passenger side of the windshield.

 

View of EdgeGuard from inside the same vehicle; passenger side. Note: field of view not impaired.


4How can a 3" wide piece of high impact resistant plastic protect my entire windshield from cracking?

The formation and rate of growth of cracks in a windshield depends on three factors:

  1. The amount of force applied to the surface of the glass,
  2. The thickness of the glass, and
  3. The amount of stress resident in the area being struck

Because of the way windshields are manufactured and mounted in vehicles, the amount of stress around the outer 2-3" perimeter is significantly greater than inside that area. So any given piece of road debris striking the windshield has a much greater chance of causing a crack if it hits this outer area. In fact, studies have shown that between 65% and 95% of all edge cracks are initiated by a piece of debris striking the outer 2-3" of the windshield.

By providing a protective barrier to the weakest portion of the windshield, EdgeGuard negates this effect -- so much so that we back the product with a 3-year warranty! So by installing EdgeGuard on your original windshield, you extend its life to the fullest extent possible.

For more information, click here.


5.  Why are "edge cracks" the cause of 65% - 95% of windshield replacements?

Because of the way windshields are manufactured and mounted in vehicles, the amount of stress around the outer 2-3" perimeter is significantly greater than inside that area.  So any given piece of road debris striking the windshield has a much greater chance of causing a crack if it hits this outer area.

Edge Cracks are the result of:

  1. A weak spot around the perimeter caused from the thermal effect during the manufacturing process.
  2. Mechanical stress from the windshield being glued to the vehicle, which also enhances the weak spot.
  3. Fracture mechanics.  The critical force for fracture decreases as you approach the edge.
  4. Theory of Elasticity.  Tension stresses are produced in the perimeter from inside vs. outside temperature variations.

6.  My windshield has some damage. What are my options?

You essentially have three (3) options:

  1. Do nothing -- if you don't value your safety or the safety of your passengers. Click here for an explanation.
  2. Have the windshield repaired.
  3. Have the windshield replaced.

The repair vs. replace decision really comes down to one (1) question: "Can it be repaired?" If the answer is "yes", it should be done immediately for two reasons:

  1. Repairs are less expensive than replacements -- many insurance companies waive the deductible for these repairs.
  2. Damage that can be repaired today can quickly develop into damage that requires a replacement tomorrow. With temperature changes and vehicle vibrations, over time, minor cracks tend to develop into major cracks.

Click here to see the National Windshield Repair Association's Final Recommended Practices. 


7How can I guard against having my windshield improperly installed?

The safety of you and your passengers depends on the use of proper windshield replacement materials and procedures. To assure you receive a proper and safe windshield replacement, verify the following in writing with your windshield replacement supplier before authorizing them to replace your windshield. Failure to properly carry out any of these steps could result in an improper and unsafe installation!

  1. The individual(s) (two are preferred) carrying out the installation is certified by an industry organization such as the National Glass Association. Certification should be in the name of the installer(s), not the shop for which they work.
  2. The glass that will be installed on your vehicle meets or exceeds the specifications established by your vehicle's manufacturer.
  3. The urethane adhesive that will be used to bond your new windshield to your vehicle's frame meets or exceeds the specifications established by your vehicle's manufacturer and is specifically designed and labeled for windshield replacements under the environmental (i.e. temperature) conditions in which your windshield will be replaced.  Important note: Make sure they tell you the recommended "Safe Drive Away Time" (i.e. how long you'll need to wait before the windshield is securely bonded to the vehicle and it's safe to operate) for the urethane adhesive used and show you how they arrived at this time. Depending on the temperature and type of urethane adhesive used, cure times can range from 1 (for 2-part urethanes) to 24 hours (for 1-part urethanes). DO NOT DRIVE THE VEHICLE BEFORE THIS PERIOD OF TIME HAS ELAPSED!
  4. The procedures that will be used to install your new windshield are approved by your vehicle's manufacturer.
  5. The lower windshield cowl panel will be removed to assure an appropriate amount of adhesive will be used to safely bond the lower portion of the windshield to the frame of the vehicle.
  6. As the urethane used to adhere the original windshield is removed, no more than 1/16" of this material will be left behind.
  7. Prior to installation, appropriate primers specifically designed and labeled for windshield replacements will be used to prepare both the new windshield and vehicle frame -- thereby allowing for a strong, long lasting, bond between the new windshield, the urethane adhesive and the vehicle's frame.
  8. All moldings damaged during the installation process will be replaced.
  9. Along with the paperwork you receive, ask for documentation that includes:
    1. Date of installation
    2. Name(s) of the individuals who installed your windshields and a copy of their certification status
    3. The source and manufacturer of the glass
    4. Lot numbers of the urethane and primers used
    5. Air temperature during installation and storage prior to the "Safe Drive Away Time" elapsing
    6. Safe Drive Away Time
    7. Sign-off by the certified installation technician(s) that the installation was done properly and successfully

8.  What can a I do to protect myself from the dangers related to faulty windshield installations?

First and foremost, keep your vehicle's original windshield as long as possible. Install EdgeGuard on the windshield immediately. Have chips, stars, bull's eyes,  and cracks repaired by a certified technician as soon as possible.

When your original windshield eventually needs to be replaced, be sure to take it to a reputable, windshield replacement shop and to save the cost and time associated with replacing the windshield any more than is necessary, have EdgeGuard installed on the new windshield.

If you've already had your windshield replaced, inspect it immediately to confirm as best as possible that it was installed properly. Click here to learn how to do this. If installed improperly, have it replaced immediately by a qualified windshield replacement shop.


9.  How can I determine if my replacement windshield was properly installed?

According to some industry experts, as much as 80% of replacement windshields are improperly installed. Most often, these are performed by mobile, "at your home or office" installers - see publications by ABC News, Fox News, The Detroit News, and the Canadian Broadcasting Co.

Short of activating the airbags, the sad truth is that you really can't be sure. The only windshield you can be absolutely sure has been installed properly is the one that was put on the vehicle at the factory; it's the only one whose installation is regulated by the federal government.

But here are some indicators:

  1. The material that was used to bond your windshield to your vehicle is not "cured"; i.e. you can pull it out from between your windshield and the body of your vehicle with your fingers.
  2. There's a leak; i.e. when it rains, water comes in through the windshield.
  3. After your windshield is replaced, you notice an increased level of road noise.

10.  What are some of the "short cuts" taken by less scrupulous windshield replacement shops?

Short cuts may save time and money -- but in the case of windshield replacements, they may also cost lives! Below are some of the most common to watch for. Don't be shy -- watch the technician do the job and make sure it gets done properly. Ask questions, and be sure to get your answers and assurances in writing.

  1. "Close-cutting" involves leaving most if not all of the original urethane in the channel after the original windshield is removed. A thin bead of new urethane is then applied to the replacement glass and installed. This can lead to leakage, rust and a high probability of bond failure.
  2. "Flush-cutting" involves trimming off the exposed portion of the windshield's molding, discarding the embedded portion and reglueing the saved portion to the edge of the new glass. A reliable indicator of flush-cutting is scarred molding.
  3. "Jumping the cowl" involves not removing the lower windshield cowl panel. By not removing the cowl panel, full contact between the lower portion of the channel and the windshield cannot be assured. Without full contact in this area, deployment of the in-dash airbag could blow out the windshield.

11.  Are windshield installations made by mobile providers as good as those done at glass shops?

Although possible, in practice, the answer is usually "no" -- primarily because the mobile installer can't control the elements such as humidity, temperature, and dust; all factors that need to be within reasonable limits during a proper, installation. For example, all surfaces need to be clean, primed, and dry for the adhesives to bond the glass to the body of the vehicle. The colder the temperature, the longer the adhesives need to cure before the vehicle is safe to operate.

Regardless of whether you take your vehicle to a shop, or have a mobile unit replace your windshield, make sure

  1. The installer is certified by an industry organization such as the National Glass Association. The certification should be in the name of the installer, not the shop for which they work.
  2. The lower windshield cowl panel is removed (assures the appropriate amount of adhesive can be used to safely bond the lower portion of the windshield to the frame of the vehicle).
  3. No more than 1/16" of the original urethane adhesive left behind.
  4. An appropriate (labeled as such) primer is used to inhibit rust -- thereby allowing for a strong, long lasting, bond between the adhesive and the vehicle's frame.
  5. The adhesive (typically urethane) used to bond the windshield to the body frame is labeled as suitable for windshield installations under the current temperature conditions.
  6. The adhesive is given enough time to properly cure before the vehicle is driven. Depending on the temperature and type of urethane adhesive used, cure times can range from 1 (for 2-part urethanes) to 24 hours (for 1-part urethanes).
  7. Moldings damaged during the process are replaced.

Failure to properly do any of these steps completely could result in an improper and unsafe installation!


12. What's EdgeGuard's impact on the environment?

EdgeGuard is extremely friendly to the environment in that it reduces the number of windshields sent to landfills.


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EdgeGuard Inc.
2458 East Main St., STE B1
Grand Junction, CO. 81501

Tel: (970)256-0200
Fax: (970)256-1786

 

www.edgeguard.com

rich@ultrabond.com


 

 

 

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